Be More Productive: 3 Key Mental Shifts

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Lots of productivity training sessions or classes seem helpful at the time. But what’s important is what actually sticks with you and helps you be more productive. That’s why I was happy when Lindsay*, the executive assistant interviewed for last week’s productivity case study, shared that she keeps these three insights from my Empowered Productivity Training in the front of her mind every single day

1. You Don’t Owe People an Instant Response

You'll be more productive if you're not constantly monitoring your email, productivity expert Maura Nevel Thomas says.

You’ll be more productive if you’re not constantly monitoring your email.

“I think that is so huge in this day and age,” Lindsay says. Our inclination is to quickly react to every incoming communication. But you’ll actually be more productive if you stop doing this. If you’re constantly monitoring your email so you can send immediate responses, you never have a chance to do focused work. And if you stay tethered to email after office hours, your brain never gets a break. When that happens, the quality of your work suffers.

2. A Thoughtful Response Beats an Immediate Reaction

 Here’s a related insight. Which one you would rather receive: an immediate, dashed-off response to your email, or a thoughtful answer that you have to wait for a little longer? Most people will choose the thoughtful response. Think about all the times you’ve received emails that were clearly written quickly. They lack information, they’re hard to understand and they may not even answer the question you asked. If you wait to deal with the message until you can take a little time to craft a better email, you’re helping both yourself and your recipient be more productive. It’s also an opportunity to build your working relationship and sense of connection, Lindsay says.

3. Listen Mindfully to Be More Productive

Lindsay also reminds herself to be fully present when she’s listening to someone else. She realized that she was doing something that a lot of us do: using the time when someone else is talking to think about what we’re going to say next. It’s not that she’s a blowhard or conceited. She just wanted to make sure she was polished and clear when it was her turn to speak. “But if I’m doing that, I’m really not listening and it’s not establishing that connection,” Lindsay says.

I invite you to learn more about my productivity training sessions like the one Lindsay attended. You can check out a preview below.   * Name changed to protect privacy    

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